World’s many pleasing collection of trash

  • Video
  • Image

This museum on a Upper East site has a twist, as it displays all your favourite and singular equipment that people have thrown into a trash.

A pointer is displayed on a second building of an East Harlem garage nearby a ‘Treasure in a Trash’ exhibit. Picture: Don Emmert


THERE’S a value trove of truly weird equipment stealing on a second building of a prosy room in New York City — a collection of other people’s trash.

For 30 years, sanitation workman Nelson Molina has been rescuing residents’ rejected equipment from a streets around a community where he grew up.

Finding a beauty in other people’s deserted effects has been a passion of Mr Molina’s given he was a tiny boy. One of 6 siblings, he explains that his relatives always taught him to “pass all down”.

“It began by picking adult tiny trinkets here and there, about 30 years ago,” he tells news.com.au. “I had dual brothers and 3 sisters, we didn’t get most for Christmas so we was like Santa Claus to them, we would only go out and collect adult anything that we found. we would repair whatever indispensable to be fixed, if we could.”

Eventually, Mr Molina’s colleagues began to contribute, entertainment gems on their rubbish run that they suspicion he competence like. Today, his Treasures in a Trash collection is so vast it fills a whole second building of a sanitation lorry repository in East Harlem, Manhattan, about 15 blocks where he was lifted and still lives today.

Former New York sanitation workman Nelson Molina in his Treasures in a Trash collection. Picture: Don Emmert

Former New York sanitation workman Nelson Molina in his ‘Treasures in a Trash’ collection. Picture: Don EmmertSource:AFP

Arranged by theme, distance and function, a tip space is a visible blast of thousands of objects once thrown divided yet now lovingly spotless and restored.

While a room isn’t open to a public, news.com.au was offering a possibility to try a startling collection, with a guided debate by a unapproachable owners himself.

After bypassing a hulk orange trucks snoozing on a belligerent building and climbing a small, high staircase during a behind of a depot, we find yourself confronting a huge space. At initial glance, it appears to be a flea market, solely even a rarest finds aren’t accessible for purchase.

“Nothing is for sale, since even yet we found it and we curate everything, it all belongs to a city so we can’t sell anything,” says Mr Molina, who estimates his accumulate to be value upwards of $US160,000 ($211,000).

A tiny Marilyn Monroe briefcase and other tiny trinkets were recovered. Picture: Don Emmert

A tiny Marilyn Monroe briefcase and other tiny trinkets were recovered. Picture: Don EmmertSource:AFP

To peruse a whole repository would take during slightest a day, and even afterwards you’re expected to skip something fascinating. Old cameras roost subsequent to a cluster of Furbies, posters of Elvis hang on a wall beside photographs of a Brooklyn Bridge.

There’s ancient tricycles, fondle trucks and tennis racquets, electric guitars and tonnes of typewriters, aged albums and a garland of teapots, stained potion windows, barbies and movement figures, sets of skis, Mets and Yankees merch, assets holds from 1945, bodybuilding trophies, selected trinket and deserted portraits of strangers.

Guitars and posters are displayed as partial of Nelson Molina's gallery. Picture: Don Emmert

Guitars and posters are displayed as partial of Nelson Molina’s gallery. Picture: Don EmmertSource:AFP

Every intent comes with an infinite story. But his favourite find? A Star of David sculpted from steel that was recovered from a site of a Twin Towers in observance of 9/11.

Until about 4 years ago — when a New York Times got breeze of it — a Treasures in a Trash collection was a sum secret. These days, someone is on-site 24/7 to keep a tighten eye on a precious gallery.

Hundreds of Buddha statues cover a vast table. Picture: Don Emmert

Hundreds of Buddha statues cover a vast table. Picture: Don EmmertSource:AFP

The lifelong New Yorker says he’s late now yet he still stops by 3 times a week to check on his rob — and to do some critical dusting, of course.

Treasures in a Trash isn’t open to a open on a daily basis, yet a group does arrange tours 3 or 4 times a month for tiny groups and Mr Molina assures me that zero creates him happier than saying people’s reactions to his dear collection.

From Furbies, to aged family photos and selected jewellery. Everything tells a story. Picture: Don Emmert

From Furbies, to aged family photos and selected jewellery. Everything tells a story. Picture: Don EmmertSource:AFP

Headline News Today Lifestyle

World’s many pleasing collection of trash

  • Video
  • Image

This museum on a Upper East site has a twist, as it displays all your favourite and singular equipment that people have thrown into a trash.

A pointer is displayed on a second building of an East Harlem garage nearby a ‘Treasure in a Trash’ exhibit. Picture: Don Emmert


THERE’S a value trove of truly weird equipment stealing on a second building of a prosy room in New York City — a collection of other people’s trash.

For 30 years, sanitation workman Nelson Molina has been rescuing residents’ rejected equipment from a streets around a community where he grew up.

Finding a beauty in other people’s deserted effects has been a passion of Mr Molina’s given he was a tiny boy. One of 6 siblings, he explains that his relatives always taught him to “pass all down”.

“It began by picking adult tiny trinkets here and there, about 30 years ago,” he tells news.com.au. “I had dual brothers and 3 sisters, we didn’t get most for Christmas so we was like Santa Claus to them, we would only go out and collect adult anything that we found. we would repair whatever indispensable to be fixed, if we could.”

Eventually, Mr Molina’s colleagues began to contribute, entertainment gems on their rubbish run that they suspicion he competence like. Today, his Treasures in a Trash collection is so vast it fills a whole second building of a sanitation lorry repository in East Harlem, Manhattan, about 15 blocks where he was lifted and still lives today.

Former New York sanitation workman Nelson Molina in his Treasures in a Trash collection. Picture: Don Emmert

Former New York sanitation workman Nelson Molina in his ‘Treasures in a Trash’ collection. Picture: Don EmmertSource:AFP

Arranged by theme, distance and function, a tip space is a visible blast of thousands of objects once thrown divided yet now lovingly spotless and restored.

While a room isn’t open to a public, news.com.au was offering a possibility to try a startling collection, with a guided debate by a unapproachable owners himself.

After bypassing a hulk orange trucks snoozing on a belligerent building and climbing a small, high staircase during a behind of a depot, we find yourself confronting a huge space. At initial glance, it appears to be a flea market, solely even a rarest finds aren’t accessible for purchase.

“Nothing is for sale, since even yet we found it and we curate everything, it all belongs to a city so we can’t sell anything,” says Mr Molina, who estimates his accumulate to be value upwards of $US160,000 ($211,000).

A tiny Marilyn Monroe briefcase and other tiny trinkets were recovered. Picture: Don Emmert

A tiny Marilyn Monroe briefcase and other tiny trinkets were recovered. Picture: Don EmmertSource:AFP

To peruse a whole repository would take during slightest a day, and even afterwards you’re expected to skip something fascinating. Old cameras roost subsequent to a cluster of Furbies, posters of Elvis hang on a wall beside photographs of a Brooklyn Bridge.

There’s ancient tricycles, fondle trucks and tennis racquets, electric guitars and tonnes of typewriters, aged albums and a garland of teapots, stained potion windows, barbies and movement figures, sets of skis, Mets and Yankees merch, assets holds from 1945, bodybuilding trophies, selected trinket and deserted portraits of strangers.

Guitars and posters are displayed as partial of Nelson Molina's gallery. Picture: Don Emmert

Guitars and posters are displayed as partial of Nelson Molina’s gallery. Picture: Don EmmertSource:AFP

Every intent comes with an infinite story. But his favourite find? A Star of David sculpted from steel that was recovered from a site of a Twin Towers in observance of 9/11.

Until about 4 years ago — when a New York Times got breeze of it — a Treasures in a Trash collection was a sum secret. These days, someone is on-site 24/7 to keep a tighten eye on a precious gallery.

Hundreds of Buddha statues cover a vast table. Picture: Don Emmert

Hundreds of Buddha statues cover a vast table. Picture: Don EmmertSource:AFP

The lifelong New Yorker says he’s late now yet he still stops by 3 times a week to check on his rob — and to do some critical dusting, of course.

Treasures in a Trash isn’t open to a open on a daily basis, yet a group does arrange tours 3 or 4 times a month for tiny groups and Mr Molina assures me that zero creates him happier than saying people’s reactions to his dear collection.

From Furbies, to aged family photos and selected jewellery. Everything tells a story. Picture: Don Emmert

From Furbies, to aged family photos and selected jewellery. Everything tells a story. Picture: Don EmmertSource:AFP

Headline News Today Lifestyle

Leave a Reply

Facebook

Get the Facebook Likebox Slider Pro for WordPress