Leicester couple’s ‘desperate’ IVF online fundraising bid

Leigh and Stacey OswinImage copyright
Stacey Oswin

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Leigh and Stacey Oswin said they were unable to fund private IVF treatment “without causing extreme hardships”

A couple has set up an online fundraising campaign in a “desperate” bid to raise £5,000 for a second cycle of private fertility treatment.

Stacey and Leigh Oswin said they were “disgusted” to receive just one NHS-funded round of in vitro fertilisation (IVF), because they lived in Leicester.

By contrast patients in Greater Manchester are offered three rounds.

Leicester City Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) said it had to prioritise its budget to benefit all patients.

Updates on this story and more from Leicestershire

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Science Photo Library

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In vitro fertilisation (IVF) is the process where a human female egg is injected with a male sperm

The Oswins said they were unable to fund private IVF treatment “without causing extreme hardships”.

Mrs Oswin, 30, from Eyres Monsell, who looks after her nephew full-time, said: “I’ve resulted to crowdfunding – I am desperate… it’s my last chance.

“It’s heartbreaking, disgusting and upsetting that other people in the country get three IVF cycles.

“I am really angry… we should be treated equally.”

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Stacey Oswin

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The Oswins had one unsuccessful cycle of NHS-funded IVF treatment

Mr Oswin, 32, who will be made redundant from a 13-year job, said they were both “emotionally drained” after their first IVF attempt failed.

The couple have been unsuccessful in trying for a baby in the last 10 years.

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Science Photo Library

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Fertility Network UK said couples should “not be forced” to resort to funding their own fertility treatment

The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence recommends women under 40 should be offered three NHS-funded IVF cycles.

The “postcode lottery” for NHS fertility services in England has been criticised by Fertility Network UK.

Susan Seenan, chief executive of the charity, said: “Denying couples the recommended treatment for their medical condition because of where they live is cruel and unethical, and is devastating for all those affected.”

She added that couples should “not be forced” to resort to funding their own fertility treatment, such as crowdfunding, providing they were eligible.

In a letter to the couple’s local MP, the CCG said it was “necessary” to make difficult decisions with limited resources.

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